Companies often don’t think about preventing workplace violence until there is an incident that affects them, or a company similar to them, or geographically close.  As soon as something happens close to home, they want to get serious and do something about it right away.

Workplace violence prevention is actually a process that, like in quantum physics, when we talked about the observed particle, just putting management’s attention on the potential problem will start the prevention process.

A good place to start is with adjusting and updating your policies.  Perhaps your policy is outdated, or hasn’t been publicized in your organization.   Time to dust it off and make sure it includes these critical elements:

1.  It says:  We have a total no-weapons policy in this company.

2.  Employees are REQUIRED to report any potential, or even suspected workplace violence situations or incidents.

3.  There is an approved company form which every employee has electronically, to use
if necessary.

4.   Every employee has to attend a violence prevention training course, or active shooter drill, or both, annually.

The policy is the first step.  Next, the policy has to be approved by the management or by the Board, and then sent to every employee, along with an affirmation agreement that they sign saying they read the policy and understand it.